Electoral College System Essay

Electoral College Vs. Popular Vote Essay

Electoral College vs. Popular Vote
When given this assignment I had no clue what topic I might choose. I waited and waited until the recent elections blew up in my face. This past election was a learning experience for me because I just turned 18. This was the first year I could ever vote and a weird election like this occurred. I noticed how many people were actually very disturbed with how Gore won the popular vote but will most likely lose the election only because he couldn't win enough electoral votes in one state.
The Electoral College was designed in 1787 at the Constitutional Convention. A variety of ideas were originally brought to attention. Two significant and highly regarded options were a) Congress selects the President and b) the popular vote. Both ideas were disregarded. Having Congress elect the President would give the legislature complete control over him (6: 159-162). The idea of the people and only the people voting for the President was eliminated because the founding fathers of the U.S. Government felt that normal people would not be able to vote for the best President in an intelligent manner. Despite the fact that many of the original convention members thought that the popular vote would be the best option, there were still too many that opposed the idea (Glennon 7). George Mason, a former political officer in the 1800's, states that a it would be "as unnatural to refer the choice of a proper character for chief Magistrate to the people, as it would, to refer a trial of colours to a blind man" (qtd. In Glennon 7).
I became very interested about the whole system of the college and thought that I could present an argument about how it's really outdated and could use a big change. And so the Electoral College is created. It is made up of electors from all of the states in the nation. The electors from each state are what we the people actually vote for in the November elections ("Electoral College"). Each state can have no less than 3 electors. This is because they get an elector for every chair they fill in both the Senate and the House of Representatives. Because all states have two Senate members and at least one House member, we see why. All together, including all of our nation's states we have an Electoral College consisting of 538 members. In order for a candidate to actually become the President he must obtain at least 270 electoral votes, giving him the majority plus one (Glennon 19). Because we use the Electoral College, it has come to occur on numerous occasions that a candidate with a higher percentage of the popular vote is defeated by his political opponent by the electoral tally (Glennon 19), thus defeating the purpose of a Democracy. A Democracy exists if we the people have "the right to self- governance." "American 'democracy' has existed for over 200 years, and citizens are ready, as they have been for decades, if not centuries, to finally control their own country" ("Electoral College...

Loading: Checking Spelling

0%

Read more

Electoral College Essay

1274 words - 5 pages Electoral College (audience: people of the U.S.) You walk into the voting booth on the first Tuesday of November to cast your vote for who you think should be President. You take your ballot into the box believing, as most people do, that your vote will be counted along with the rest of the population. You do this because you believe it could be the deciding vote for the presidential race. Well, you are horribly mistaken. What you may not...

the origin of electoral college Essay

825 words - 3 pages      In the United States of America, the presidential election takes place every four years, on the first Tuesday of November [1]. Most people believe they are directly voting for the presidential candidate, and the person with the most popular votes will win the election. However, instead of voting for the presidential candidate, people are voting for the electors, individuals who vote in the Electoral College....

Electoral College Essay

540 words - 2 pages The Electoral College is not on the votes cast directly by the people but by a group of people elected by the citizens. This group of officials known also as "presidential electors" is the Electoral College. Each state is assigned a certain number of candidates. In total, the United States has 538...

Electoral College System

1054 words - 4 pages Analyze criticism of the "Electoral College" system and the alleged advantages and disadvantages of various reform proposals. The Electoral College is a system in which the individual voter does not actually vote directly for the president. When a person votes they are voting for an elector that has pledged their vote or allegiance to the running party. The Framers realized that without widespread communications available at the time and with...

Impact of eliminating the

553 words - 2 pages The Impact of Eliminating the Electoral College The Electoral College is a very large part of determining which candidate for presidency will become the next Chief Executive of the United States of America. Often...

The Past, Present, and Future of the Electoral College

1775 words - 7 pages In the United States, the Electoral College determines the victor of a national election. Each state has its own number of electoral votes, which is determined by state population. This system is a “winner takes all” system. Which means the candidate with 50 percent or more of the votes in an individual state gets all of that states electoral votes. The 2016 presidential election will have 538 electoral votes, this means that the election will be...

Republican Unfairness (problems with the Electoral College).

756 words - 3 pages George PuicaModel CongressRepublican Unfairness"The Electors shall meet in their respective States and vote by ballot for President and Vice-President" (Amendment XII: to Article II, Section 3 of U.S. Constitution). These words would differentiate the United States from...

The Electoral College Should be Abolished for many Clearly Defined Reasons.

892 words - 4 pages Have you ever wondered where America would be right now if Albert Gore had won the 2000 presidential election, as determined by the popular vote? In the 2000 election, Gore won the popular majority of votes cast for the president in the United States, but because of a system called The Electoral College, George Bush was given the White House. The Electoral College is a system of voting based upon population of individual states: each state is...

Electoral College

1147 words - 5 pages IntroductionWhen Americans vote for a President and Vice President, they are actually voting for presidential electors, known collectively as the Electoral College. It is these electors, chosen by the people, who elect the chief executive. The Constitution assigns each state a number of electors equal to the combined total of the state?s Senate and House of Representatives delegations; at present, the number of electors per state ranges...

Why we need a new election system, problems with the electoral system.

517 words - 2 pages The Electoral College is an obsolete institution that undermines the citizens' involvement in government. The idea that a candidate can win the popular vote yet lose the election is ridiculous, and only through a system...

The Importance of the Electoral College

1099 words - 4 pages The Importance of the Electoral College Though our founding fathers created the Electoral College over 200 years ago, it has been changed with time to accommodate modern needs and is still an important and necessary part of our electoral system. The Electoral College ensures political stability in our nation by encouraging the two-party system and also protects the interests of minorities. Furthermore, the Electoral College helps maintain a...

The Electoral College System Essays

520 Words3 Pages

The Electoral College System

After the last presidential election, which is still underway apparently, there is much controversy over what should happen to the Electoral College system. There are people who say that the Electoral College is good but should be modified to meet the needs of the modern world. There are those who say that the Electoral College system is too outdated to be modified and should be entirely eliminated. Finally there are those who say that it is has stood the test of time and is still the best system for our country.

The original framers of the constitution obviously preferred the electoral system to a direct popular election. The argument that historians give for this is that they preferred this system…show more content…

There have been many attempts to reform or even scrap the Electoral College election sense it's birth. The most recent one being in 1997 when congress debated a constitutional amendment to replace the electoral system with a direct popular vote system. However the Electoral College system to this day remains virtually un-changed from its original form. The only exception is the twelfth amendment, which requires each elector to cast two votes, one for president and one for vice president.

Under the current system there are five hundred and thirty eight electors. Each state gets one elector, each representative, and a senator. A presidential candidate needs two hundred and seventy votes to win the election. The electors meet after the November popular election to cast their votes and officially elect the president. Electors may vote for whomever they wish. Each state's electoral votes are awarded on a winner take all bases.

The arguments to modify or eliminate the Electoral College system are all derived from the notion that it is outdated. Under the current system if a candidate wins a large states like California, then they win twenty percent of the needed votes even though California only accounts for eleven percent of the U.S. population. What's more is a president can be elected without winning a majority of the popular vote. This has happened 15 times in U.S. history. The

Show More

0 thoughts on “Electoral College System Essay

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *